2014 Was a Great Year for Science, Engineering, and Business – Enabled by Cloud Computing

2014 Was a Great Year for Science, Engineering, and Business – Enabled by Cloud Computing

 “We are in awe of the amazing things our customers accomplished  with the Cloud in 2014 – you managed risk, designed better products, and fought disease. What an exciting year! Thanks for letting us be a part of that. We look forward to making more rules with you in 2015!”   This is the message we sent out to customers & partners to welcome 2015. The New Year holiday is always a great time to reflect on what the past, and look forward to the future. We at Cycle Computing feel honored to be part of the work our customers are doing. When we look back, 2014 was indeed one to remember. From the various Cloud computing records we’ve helped establish, to the great science and engineering work we help enable, it’s always important to remember that we never do it alone. In that spirit, I’ve included a few take-aways concepts, and below that some of the Cycle Computing highlights from 2014. Scientists and engineers are now getting better answers, faster – and this is transforming business operations. Getting streamlined, reliable access to cloud computing resources has enabled them to ask the right questions without being limited by the computing infrastructure they own in-house; Cycle Computing continues to break industry records for Cloud HPC scale, performance, and time to answer. But, the most important thing is the amazing work are customers are doing. From fighting cancer, to developing better products, to better business decision-making – we can’t help but be excited about how we’re helping improve the world; and Nothing great is ever accomplished alone. We’re humbled to be...

Cloud Computing Business Benefits & Technical Details Behind Fortune 500 Manufacturing Simulation

I want to share an insideHPC slidecast interview about an Enterprise-speed Cloud run we did for HGST (a Western Digital company). But first, let’s take a quick look at the business benefits of Cloud cluster computing. Because this particular run was record-setting and included a Fortune 500 manufacturing company, we’ve received a lot of attention & press coverage about it (The Register, ZDNet, EnterpriseTech, HPCwire, etc.). A lot of the focus has been paid to how Cycle Computing was able to enable a 70,000+ core run so quickly. But behind the scenes, it’s maybe even more important to understand what the business benefits are that are driving Cloud cluster computing adoption. The Business Challenge The business challenge for HGST was common to other manufacturing companies: How do we accelerate common business functions, to help reduce design cycle times? Solution & Benefit: For HGST, speed & agility for its research and development efforts are of paramount importance. When Cycle Computing found out about the run on a Wednesday, it was able to accomplish all of the set-up, and complete the entire Cloud computing run by the weekend. This particular workload traditionally has taken about one month to complete in the past running on internal clusters. By leveraging Cloud computing, the workload ran from start to finish in about eight hours. And the total cost of this run was only $5,500. Manufacturing workload: Design Optimization of >1 Million designs Project Agility: From project idea, to completion – about four days Time Savings: From 1 Month to 8 hours Value: Only cost $5,500 Technical Details: There are a lot of exciting things...

Bridging the [Cloud HPC] Gap. Insights & Images from SC14 & AWS re:Invent

By Brad Rutledge, Cycle Computing VP of Marketing Looking out over the bridge, it’s clear to see researchers & IT crossing together. At the same time enterprise scientists & engineers are being led by corporate CIOs, also crossing this bridge together. Looking the other direction, the bridge leads to the Cloud. And back. From this perspective, it seems we’re right in the middle of it all. In fact, depending where you stand, we may in fact be the bridge itself. After attending two very different events in November, the AWS re:Invent 2014 conference in Las Vegas, and then SC14 (Supercomputing) in New Orleans, the feeling of movement is undeniable. The Cloud HPC gap has been bridged. Call it a tipping point, momentum, or just a strong wind at your back – the energy, interest, and action in crossing that bridge is obvious.  As with any market disruption, industry visionaries have led the way. Early adopters like The Hartford, Johnson & Johnson, Life Technologies, JP Morgan Chase, Purdue University, Pfizer, The Aerospace Corporation, and Lockheed Martin have worked hard with Cycle Computing to take Cloud HPC from an experiment, to today where we deliver production workloads and results, at enterprise-speed. Now we look to leading enterprises & research institutions that demand more. It’s these organizations that are helping make Cloud cluster computing adoption easier, and faster. HGST (a Western Digital company), Novartis, University of Southern California, and many others like NASA, and Stanford, who recently were recognized for their innovative use of Cloud HPC, represent that acceleration in market adoption. Attending re:Invent & SC14 back-to-back was a clear demonstration of...

Cloud HPC Has Ecosystem & Tools In Place for Wide Market Adoption – Cycle Computing’s AWS re:Invent Preview

By Brad Rutledge, Cycle Computing Vice President of Marketing In the three years since AWS has hosted it’s re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, we’ve seen the Cloud HPC story go from being told by the early adopters that it really works, to last year’s record-breaking news around scale and performance with the MegaRun, to this year, where we’ll be demonstrating a massive shift in Cloud HPC adoption, and showcasing the tools and maturing ecosystem that are enabling it. In only it’s third year as a conference, re:Invent 2014 is sold out, and is bringing more than 10,000 attendees to the Venetian and the Sands Convention Center. If you’re attending, make sure to see Cycle Computing booth #125 and learn how our One-click Cloud cluster containers is enabling Cloud HPC to help you achieve Better Answers, Faster. The market is primed and moving fast – Cycle’s role in this is two-fold: Our software CycleServer, CycleCloud, and DataMan help users simply & securely conduct Cloud HPC. It’s never been easier than it is today with our One-click Cloud Cluster Containers, free Test Drives, and Cloud-ready Technical Computing Applications; By making it easier to try, and ultimately implement Cloud HPC for regular production workloads, we’re accelerating market adoption. Below is what you can expect to experience with Cycle at re:Invent. Cloud HPC Test Drives Cycle Computing has launched a Cloud HPC Test Drive program to provide users with a hands-on experience that showcases the power and ease of using Cycle Computing software to connect and run common workloads in Life Sciences, Manufacturing, and general HPC, on AWS. We’ll be running two Cloud...
Closing the Computation Gap that Engineers and Scientists Face using Cloud HPC

Closing the Computation Gap that Engineers and Scientists Face using Cloud HPC

By Brad Rutledge, Cycle Computing VP of Marketing A common problem we think about at Cycle Computing is the gap that exists between the researchers & designers – to the computing power they need to do their jobs. Sometimes that gap is a frustratingly long queue time, and more often than not, that gap limits the types of questions that can be asked. One answer of course is Cloud HPC. In a recent interview published by Intel Health & Life Sciences, Cycle CEO Jason Stowe outlines not only the problem of this gap in modern genomes analysis, clinical trial simulations, and drug development, but also showcases an example of what’s possible when that gap is eliminated. In the video, Stowe says: “We’re looking to take the problem of access off the table. Imagine scientists who can ask the right question at the right scale, at any time – and all without worrying about what infrastructure is available to them.”   Resources Intel Health & Life Sciences blog: How to Conduct 264 Years of Research in 18 Hours Video: How to Conduct 264 Years of Research in 18...